37.3 F
Westborough, US
Friday, March 22, 2019

Cruises offer fun for every interest

By Victor Block Civil War buffs Tom and Elaine Preston wander through reconstructed forts where a major battle of that conflict was fought. Betsy and...

Caribbean island Nevis: Birthplace of Alexander Hamilton

The islands are two miles and a 45-minute ferry boat ride apart. From the air, one resembles a ball and the other a chubby baseball bat. They share their history and a common government.  Yet Nevis (pronounced Nee-vis) and St. Kitts each has its own distinct personality.  

Genealogy tourism is a fast-growing trend

Planning a visit to Poland, where his ancestors had lived, Bernard Janicki went online and tracked down the parish priest in the village where his mother had been born. When he arrived in that small town, the pastor helped him examine church records dating back to the early 20th century.

Visiting New York with the grandkids

Impaling a bright red strawberry on the end of a wooden shish kebab skewer, I held the fruit under a gushing fountain of milk chocolate, then popped it into my eager mouth.

Winter getaways closer to home

In Savannah, Georgia, the sun heats the temperature into the pleasant 50s on most days. That’s perfect for strolling through what has been described as one of the loveliest cities in the world.

Valley Forge: Victory over despair

No battles were fought at Valley Forge. Not a shot was fired at an enemy. Yet the 3,600-acre setting may be the best-known site associated with the Revolutionary War.

Scary creatures (real or imagined) from around the world

With Halloween approaching, witches, goblins and other scary creatures – real or imagined – will be on many people’s minds. And soon at their front doors, demanding a “Trick or Treat.”

England’s Lake District filled with charm and history

When I arrived in the northwest corner of England which prompted poets and other writers to wax so eloquently, it didn’t take long to understand why.

Namibia, a real jungle adventure

A pride of lions feasts on the body of a rhinoceros as dozens of zebra, antelope and other animals look on. Dwellers in simple mud-plastered shelters live much as their ancestors did centuries ago.

Colonial Williamsburg brings history to life in Virginia

As the pounding of the sheriff’s wooden staff calls the court to order, James Hubbard prepares to defend his client. He is an orphan’s guardian who stands accused of squandering his charge’s estate. Centering his neat wig and smoothing the frilly lace sleeves of his shirt, the attorney bows to the bench and begins to plead his case. This scene is repeated today in the same place where it occurred during the 1770s. That is when James Hubbard lived and practiced law in Williamsburg, at a time that the town served as the capital of the Virginia colony.
Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly.Update my browser now

×