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Friday, September 18, 2020

3 common money missteps grandparents make

It’s so tempting to want to give the grandchildren everything and put their wants and needs first. However, one of the common money mistakes grandparents make is to put spending on grandkids ahead of their own retirement security.

States’ grandparent visitation laws raise concern

A growing number of grandparents are pushing lawmakers around the country to change state standards they say are too restrictive and ignore the unique bonds many grandparents have with their grandchildren.

Women face extra obstacles to secure retirement

The fear of ending up poor or even running out of money in retirement still gnaws at many women in particular.

Health overhaul’s long-term care insurance plan bites the dust

Kennedy’s original idea was to give families some financial breathing room. Most families cannot afford to hire a home health aide for a frail elder, let alone pay nursing home bills. Care is usually provided by family members, often a spouse who may also have health problems.

Adult children living with parents on rise

Christy Landrigan, of Fort Wayne, belongs to a growing number of adults who have moved back in with their parents. Adult children living at home climbed from 19 percent to 22 percent in Allen County between 2000 and 2010, according to recently released census figures.

Aging boomers strain cities built for the young

By Lauran Neergaard WASHINGTON — America’s cities are beginning to grapple with a fact of life: People are getting old, fast, and they’re doing it in...

Yes, you can still sell your home in a down market

The bright side of selling a home in a down market is you get to seek your own bargain if you’re going to buy after you’re done. Closing a sale, however, can be teeth-grindingly slow if you don’t do everything right — and maybe even if you do.

4 steps for planning retirement health care costs

A new survey by Sun Life Financial found that 92 percent of workers said they don’t know how much their health care will cost in retirement or vastly underestimate the amount.

Boomers retire, shift from saving to spending

The market bottom was just two years ago, so investors are still fearful of steep loses. They’re looking for more ways to guarantee that they can turn their savings into a steady income stream without totally handing over control of their money.

Myths about money in retirement punctured

We haven’t saved enough, too many of us retire without financial security, and we may need to work longer to achieve it — assuming we can hang onto our jobs or find new ones. No wonder that workers and retirees are more pessimistic about their future prospects than they’ve been in years.